Growing Up "Birmingham"

Birmingham, as photographed by a fifty something Birmingham native

12 notes

"Old Hillman" on Flickr.Hillman Hospital - the humble origins of the rambling UAB Medical Center complex. 
Originally named the Hospital of United Charity, with the goal of serving the poor and indigent without regard to race and gender, it first opened in Birmingham’s Southside neighborhood in 1888 in rented space in an existing building.
Through the years the hospital grew and in 1903, the building now known as “Old Hillman”, named for its benefactor,  D. Thomas Hillman, President of the Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Company, opened.
In the summer of 1945, it became the home of the new Medical College of Alabama - the forerunner to the University of Alabama School of Medicine. The hospital continued to house charity patients, while serving as the home to the medical school - providing space for faculty and staff and for student teaching. 
In the decades following its transfer to the university, Hillman Hospital has served many purposes: a hospital for charity patients, a temporary home for the School of Dentistry, and most recently, a location for UAB administrative and staff offices.

"Old Hillman" on Flickr.

Hillman Hospital - the humble origins of the rambling UAB Medical Center complex.

Originally named the Hospital of United Charity, with the goal of serving the poor and indigent without regard to race and gender, it first opened in Birmingham’s Southside neighborhood in 1888 in rented space in an existing building.

Through the years the hospital grew and in 1903, the building now known as “Old Hillman”, named for its benefactor, D. Thomas Hillman, President of the Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Company, opened.

In the summer of 1945, it became the home of the new Medical College of Alabama - the forerunner to the University of Alabama School of Medicine. The hospital continued to house charity patients, while serving as the home to the medical school - providing space for faculty and staff and for student teaching.

In the decades following its transfer to the university, Hillman Hospital has served many purposes: a hospital for charity patients, a temporary home for the School of Dentistry, and most recently, a location for UAB administrative and staff offices.

Filed under birmingham alabama birmingham alabama Hillman Hospital UAB UAB Medical Center photograph

8 notes

untitled on Flickr."Four Little Girls" - you will hear that phrase a lot over the next few weeks. September 15th will be the 50th anniversary of the single most despicable event that occurred during the tumultuous summer and fall of 1963.  Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Wesley were attending Sunday School in the basement of the 16th Street Baptist Church on that Sunday morning when a bomb exploded, taking their lives. This tragedy was the culmination of a year of violence and protests centered around equal rights for all races. 
1963 has been called “The Year Everything Changed”. The events of September 15, 1963 defined that year. Enough was enough! Even my parents, who had been somewhat vocal in their disdain for “those demonstrators”, had little to say about this - shocking events have that effect on people. Today, this seems like ancient history for many of us - but being a child of the sixties, I hope I never forget what our world was like then and the journey we (Birmingham) have travelled. This town is not perfect (name one that is), but it is a far better place to live than it was in 1963. 
On this anniversary take the time to understand and appreciate where we were and where we have come to. If this happened before your time, spend a little effort learning about these events and how they so significantly altered history. If you are black, seek out that relative or family friend who was a “foot soldier”, thank them for what they did, and listen to their stories of those days. If you are white, take the time to gain an understanding of just how different this world was in 1963. To some degree, we have “come together”, but never ever forget how polarized we were. 
Remember, Birmingham is far from perfect, but it is a far better place to live than it was in 1963.

untitled on Flickr.

"Four Little Girls" - you will hear that phrase a lot over the next few weeks. September 15th will be the 50th anniversary of the single most despicable event that occurred during the tumultuous summer and fall of 1963. Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Wesley were attending Sunday School in the basement of the 16th Street Baptist Church on that Sunday morning when a bomb exploded, taking their lives. This tragedy was the culmination of a year of violence and protests centered around equal rights for all races.

1963 has been called “The Year Everything Changed”. The events of September 15, 1963 defined that year. Enough was enough! Even my parents, who had been somewhat vocal in their disdain for “those demonstrators”, had little to say about this - shocking events have that effect on people. Today, this seems like ancient history for many of us - but being a child of the sixties, I hope I never forget what our world was like then and the journey we (Birmingham) have travelled. This town is not perfect (name one that is), but it is a far better place to live than it was in 1963.

On this anniversary take the time to understand and appreciate where we were and where we have come to. If this happened before your time, spend a little effort learning about these events and how they so significantly altered history. If you are black, seek out that relative or family friend who was a “foot soldier”, thank them for what they did, and listen to their stories of those days. If you are white, take the time to gain an understanding of just how different this world was in 1963. To some degree, we have “come together”, but never ever forget how polarized we were.

Remember, Birmingham is far from perfect, but it is a far better place to live than it was in 1963.

Filed under Kelly Ingram Park birmingham alabama mlk 16th Street Baptist birmingham civil rights district photograph